Broken Tooth

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Broken Tooth


A broken tooth is a very common condition. Teeth often break from being overfilled and/or having decay in the tooth and/or having existing cracks. Teeth break in different ways from simple chips of the enamel through to a full split of the tooth. It is important to see your dentist when a tooth breaks as they are often very treatable caught early.

Causes

Exisiting Cracks

Decay

Large Fillings

Bruxism/Tooth Grinding

Symptoms

Hot/Cold Sensitivity

Sharp tooth

Tooth rough on tounge

Treatment

Treatment can vary with broken teeth. For small chips at times all that is required is a smooth of the sharp edge or a small white filling. For large fractures/breaks often a crown is recommended to protect the remaining the tooth and to prevent this from fracturing.

Bruxism / Grinding

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Bruxism / Grinding


Bruxism is a condition in which you regularly clench and grind your teeth. This typically occurs either unconsciously during the day or whilst sleeping. When this grinding occurs on a regular basis, the teeth can become damaged and other oral health complications can manifest such as jaw disorders and headaches.  Often people with bruxism are unaware of the condition until signs and symptoms arise.

Bruxism can be a by-product of sleeping disorders, high stress lifestyles, anxiety or hyperactive, aggressive personality types. It is also common in young children who may then grow out of it in their teenage years.

Causes

Poor Sleep

High Stress

Anxiety

Hyperactive

Aggressive Personalities

Symptoms

Noise of grinding waking sleeping partner.

Exposed layers of tooth due to worn enamel.

Tight or painful jaw muscles causing pain or tenderness.

Dull headache or jaw pain upon waking.

Flattened, fractured, chipped or loose teeth.

Treatment

Currently the most common form of treatment is the construction of a bite splint to protect your teeth from grinding while you sleep. Botox injections in the jaw are also on the rise as a popular course of treatment.

Cracked Tooth Syndrome

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Cracked Tooth Syndrome


Cracked Tooth syndrome occurs when multiple teeth have suffered cracks. These cracks can be located on the surface of the tooth or in some cases they can go right through the tooth. Molars are the most common teeth that suffer from cracking. 

Causes

Grinding

Clenching Teeth

Teeth that have large fillings

Teeth that have had Root Canal Treatments

Symptoms

Pain when biting harder foods

Hot cold sensitivity

Treatment

The treatment for a cracked tooth is to firstly reinforce the tooth and hold the cracked area together. This is often done with a crown. If the crack has travelled through to the nerve then sometimes a root canal treatment is required. If the crack has gone right through the tooth then sometimes removal is required. The course of treatment that our dentists will recommend will depend on the severity and location of the fracture.

Crowded Teeth

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Crowded Teeth


Crowded teeth is caused by a disparity between the size of your teeth and the size of your jaw – either the jaw too small or the teeth too large. If the teeth are misaligned, they will be unable to perform their vital functions. 

Causes

Small Jaws

Large tooth shape

Thumb Sucking

Impacted or unusually shaped teeth

Trauma

Symptoms

Teeth out of alignment

Bucked Teeth

Crocked Teeth

Unhappy with your smile

Unable to close lips

Treatment

Crowded Teeth can be straightened using Orthodontics. This is best performed by a specialist Orthodontist. Our in House Specialist will recommend the best treatment tailored for straightening your teeth.

Dead Tooth (Necrotic Tooth)

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Dead Tooth (Necrotic Tooth)


A dead (non-vital) tooth is one in which the tooth’s pulp containing nerve fibers and blood vessels has no access to blood flow. In essence, the nerve in the tooth has died. This tends to be caused by either tooth decay or trauma.

 

If dental decay or infection goes untreated, it can advance towards the tooth’s nerve in an inflammatory response, cutting of the blood supply and killing the tooth’s pulp.

Alternatively, if the tooth receives a hard knock such as a sports injury or a fall, the blood supply at the root’s tip can be severed causing the pulp to die.

Causes

Dental Decay

Infection

Trauma

Symptoms

Teeth darkening (bruising from the dying blood cells).

Pain

Bad tastes in the mouth

Swelling 

Draining Sinus

Pain when biting

Treatment

When a tooth nerve dies there are two main treatments available. A root canal treatment or extraction of the tooth. The space can then be managed afterwards with an implant.

Dental Anxiety

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Dental Anxiety


Dental anxiety is very common and is often related to negative or traumatic past experiences at the dentist. Dental anxiety can cause hot/cold sweats, and spiked emotional responses. Good patient dentist communication is the key to managing this anxiety.

Causes

Traumatic Past Experiences

Anxious Personality

Poor Sleep

Symptoms

Panic at the dentist

Sweating

Erratic Behavior

Treatment

Our team of dentists take special care treating nervous patients – kids and adults alike. In our award winning designed clinic, our team will do our best to achieve your utmost comfort before, during and after treatment.

We do also offer a full range of sedation that the team can discuss with you upon consultation.

Tooth Decay (Dental Caries)

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Tooth Decay (Dental Caries)


Dental caries is another term for cavities or decay. The human mouth is full of bacteria, saliva, bits of food and other natural substances which all build up on the teeth as plaque. Specific types of bacteria in the plaque produce acids that can breakdown the tooth. Dental Decay starts as a softening of the enamel and this can then lead to bacteria entering the dentine and breaking this area down into a ‘hole’. 

Causes

Diet High in Sugar

Poor Oral Hygiene

Susceptible to particular bacterial strains

Poor Saliva Flow

Symptoms

Hot Cold Sensitivity

Hole in a tooth

Dark spot on a tooth

Pain with sweet foods

Treatment

The treatment of dental caries largely depends on the stage at which the decay is at. In early cases a prevention strategy may be effective however in advanced cases fillings are usually necessary where by the infected tooth structure is removed and replaced with an artificial material.

Dental Erosion

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Dental Erosion


Dental erosion is a special type of tooth wear causing irreversible loss of tooth structure by acids in the mouth. The most common cause of this erosion is by acidic food and drinks. Soft drinks, fruit juices, some alcohol, prolonged exposure to chlorinated pool water, and regurgitation of stomach acid are examples of acidic products that contribute to this unique form of erosion.

Causes

High Acid Diet

Poor Saliva Flow

Reflux

Over Brushing

Symptoms

Worn Teeth

Sensitive teeth

Sensitivity to hot and cold

Discolored teeth

Treatment

The best treatment for dental erosion is prevention before it worsens. Prevention includes – diet modification, investigation into possible reflux and special toothpaste products. Advanced cases of erosion can warrant full mouth rebuilds of the lost tooth structure.

Yellow Teeth (Discoloured)

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Yellow Teeth (Discoloured)


Tooth discoloration is a common reason that many people become unhappy with their smiles. There are several types of discoloration including Extrinstic, Intrinsic and Age-related.

 

Extrinsic discolouration refers to the staining of the enamel (the tooth’s outer layer) often attributed to lifestyle factors such as consumption of coffee, wine, green tea, cola, other food and drinks, with smoking also a cause of extrinsic staining.

Intrinsic refers to the dentin (inner tooth) darkens or develops a yellow hue.

Age-related discoloration incorporates both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. As we age, the enamel on the outer layer of the teeth thins, revealing the colour of the dentin beneath. Dentin naturally yellows over time and thus, the teeth appear more discolored. Extrinisc lifestyle factors explained above also play an important role in discolouration as we age.

Causes

Coffee

Wine

Tea

Smoking

Age

Trauma

Symptoms

Teeth Slowly Yellow

Teeth are darker

Unhappy with your smile

Treatment

Dry Socket

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Dry Socket


Dry socket is usually an avoidable condition, but neglecting proper post-operative care can cause this extremely painful condition following tooth removal. Once extracted, the tooth leaves a ‘socket’ behind in the mouth. In side the socket once the tooth is removed, a clot develops to protect the nerve while the area heals. If the blood clot is disrupted or broken down before healing takes place the nerves or bone can become exposed. Following an extraction we will give you a list of instructions to avoid this condition.

Causes

Smoking following extraction

Poor Oral Hygiene

Alcohol consumption

Difficult extraction

Symptoms

Acute Pain 3-4 days following extraction

Foul smell following extraction

Throbbing in Jaw

Treatment

The key is prevention of dry socket. It is important to follow all of the post operative instructions provided by your dentist. If dry socket does occur then the dentist will rinse out and dress the socket. Antibiotics and painkillers are at times also prescribed.

If you believe you have dry socket it is important that you get in touch with our team as soon as possible for treatment

Failing old silver fillings

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Failing old silver fillings


Amalgam fillings or ‘silver’ fillings are not all that common these days, however this material has been an establishment in dentistry for quite sometime. Amalgam as a material is very successful however often patients hold onto their silver fillings far too long and this can cause subsequent cracking and recurrent decay

Causes

Lack of Maintenance of Fillings

Heavy Bite

Poor Oral Hygiene

Poor Placement at time of Filling

Symptoms

Pain on biting

Sensitivity to hot and cold

Food trapping between teeth

Treatment

These days there are a huge range of available replacements for silver fillings – fortunately these materials are tooth colored. Small failing silver fillings are best replaced with composite restorations whilst larger amalgams are best removed and replaced with crowns or using our CEREC machine.

Gingivitis

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Gingivitis


Gingivitis is defined as inflammation of the gum tissue without a loss of the bone the bone structure supporting the teeth.

The key presentation of gingivitis is bleeding gums.

Left untreated gingivitis can progress into periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is when the bone around the tooth starts to break down from the inflammation.

Causes

Poor brushing

Poor flossing

Mouth Breathing

Family history of Gum issues

Smoking

Symptoms

Bleeding Gums

Gums bleed when brushing

Swollen Gums

Wedging feeling between teeth

Throbbing feeling between teeth

Treatment

If you have bleeding gums it is important to see a hygienist. The hygienist will clean all of the hard and soft deposits off your teeth – removing all the bacteria that irritate your gums. It is important to treat gingivitis as early as possible to prevent the onset of gum disease/periodontal disease.

Gum Recession

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Gum Recession


Gum recession is when the gum tissue recedes, lowering its position on the tooth. Gum recession can be mild, moderate or severe. In mild cases we often modify brushing techniques and products. In severe cases the roots of the teeth can become exposed leading to sensitivity issues and also decay on the root surfaces. Recession is a condition that occurs as we age – however it is important for your dentist to pick up whether or not the rate of recession is accelerated for your age.

Causes

Poor Oral Hygiene

Poor brushing technique

Over Brushing

Genetics

Gum Disease

Symptoms

Wobbly Teeth

Long Teeth

Tooth Sensitivity

Treatment

For mild cases of recession our hygienist will talk through the correct brushing techniques to prevent further recession. For more severe cases we sometimes require the help of a periodontist to fix up the resulting defects. Early detection and treatment is key in recession.

Halitosis

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Halitosis


Halitosis (bad breath) is common, in fact studies show that 50% of adults have had bad breath at some stage in their life. There are several causes for bad breath, most harmless. On occasion, however, it can be a sign of a more serious condition. 

Causes

Bacteria (naturally occurring in the mouth)

Dry Mouth. This can be caused by certain medications, breathing through your mouth or problems with the salivary gland. In essence, a lack of saliva reduces the amount that your mouth is being naturally cleaned.

Some foods (e.g. Garlic)

Smoking & Tobacco

Gum Disease

Symptoms

Foul smell coming from oral cavity

Funny taste in mouth

Partner mentions bad breath

Bad Breath

Treatment

If you a suffering from bad breath the best person to see is a dental hygienist. They will talk about the ways in which you can cure your bad breath. Often a good clean of your teeth removing plaque and tarter goes a long way to curing bad breath. Good home care is also very important – including brushing – flossing and cleaning your tongue.

Impacted Wisdom Teeth

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Impacted Wisdom Teeth


Wisdom teeth are the last 4 teeth to come through into the mouth out of the 32 adult teeth. They tend to appear in the later teenage/early adult ages. When there is not enough room in the mouth to accommodate the wisdom teeth they can become twisted, tilted or displaced when trying to emerge.  Often you may be unaware that you have impacted wisdom teeth, as they don’t always show symptoms. The pain associated with impacted wisdom teeth is a condition called pericoronitis where by the gum around the wisdom tooth gets infected and inflamed.

 

Our x-ray technology can be used to asses wisdom teeth and the various degrees of impaction, if any.

Causes

Small Jaw Size

Large Tooth Size

Symptoms

Pain in jaw

Pain in the gum

Jaw ache

Swollen lymph nodes

Headaches

Treatment

If you feel you are having issues with your wisdom teeth the first place to start is a panoramic Xray. This xray will assess the degree of impaction and if removal is required. Most insurance policy’s cover this treatment. If you are nervous we also have a range of sedation options available. Short term antibiotics can be used to mange any acute infections.

Missing Teeth

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Missing Teeth


A tooth can be missing for several reasons. This may be a previous extraction by a dentist or that the tooth is stuck coming through. Sometimes teeth are congenitally missing – meaning they never grew. The resulting gap of a missing tooth can cause an unaesthetic smile if in the smile zone or if in the chewing region can cause discomfort when chewing sharper foods. When teeth are missing the teeth around the gap often shift and this can create misalignment of the teeth.

Causes

Removal of a tooth

Impacted Tooth – Stuck

Congenitally missing tooth

Symptoms

Crowded teeth

Gaps

Teeth have moved

Treatment

For teeth that are stuck sometimes these can be moved into place with Orthodontic Treatment.

If a tooth has been removed then a missing tooth can be replaced with either a denture, bridge or dental implant.

At times there is no harm in leaving a gap.

Gum Disease (Periodontal Disease)

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Gum Disease (Periodontal Disease)


Periodontal (Gum) disease is defined as inflammation of the gum line that has lead to the breakdown of the bone that supports your teeth. In the initial stages, one of the key causes is the build-up of plaque, releasing toxins that cause the gums to become irritated and inflamed – a condition known as gingivitis. If untreated, the bone loss around the tooth causes a ‘pocket’ to form between the gum and the tooth, resulting in further build-up of plaque. Overtime this may result in the teeth loosening and requiring extraction. 

Causes

Untreated Gingivitis

Poor Oral Hygiene

Family History of Gum Disease

Lack of Flossing

Smoking

Symptoms

Bad Breath

Loose Teeth

Bleeding Gums

Gaps Between Teeth

Sore when chewing on tooth

Treatment

Treatment of gum disease depends at what stage the gum disease is at.
A dental hygienist will firstly start by assessing how much bone has been lost around the teeth by recording a periodontal chart. Regular full mouth cleaning with a hygienist combined with fastidious oral hygiene is the mainstay of periodontal treatment. Left untreated this disease can lead to tooth loss.

Sensitive Teeth

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Sensitive Teeth


Having sensitive teeth is a very common condition. Sometimes a sensitive tooth can indicate an underlying hole or infection in the nerve of a tooth however commonly sensitivity is related to an exposed root surface of a tooth due to recession. 

Causes

Enamel Erosion

Dental Decay

Gum Recession leading to exposure of root 

Over brushing

Grinding

Whitening toothpastes

Symptoms

Sensitivity to cold drinks

Breathing air hurts

Treatment

If the cause of sensitivity is exposed root surfaces, then treatment is aimed at sealing this exposed surface. This can be done by the dentist with special desensitizers applied in the clinic or at home with a desensitizing tooth paste such as sensodyne.

Snoring

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Snoring


Snoring and Sleep Apnoea are common conditions that cause disruptions for both yourself and your partner. Snoring is caused by an obstruction to your breathing, generally by the tongue. This causes a vibration that we know as snoring. If the obstruction to breathing is more severe, it can cause you to wake up during the night without realizing (unremembered awakenings) – resulting in restless and disturbed sleep. 

Causes

Being Overweight

Poor Diet

Excess Alcohol intake

Poor Sleep

Tooth Grinding

Symptoms

Waking Tired

Headaches in the morning

Sore Jaw

Partner waking in the night

Treatment

Treatment of snoring is best done with a snoring appliance. There are different appliances available – the appliance positions the lower jaw in a more forward position to allow an opening in the airway.

TMJ (Temperomandibular Joint) Dysfunction

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TMJ (Temperomandibular Joint) Dysfunction


TMJ is short for the “temporomandibular joint’, it is the joint that acts as a ‘hinge’ connecting your jaw to your skull. When the joint becomes damaged or injured it can result in localized pain referred to as TMJ syndrome. 

Causes

Injury to the jaw

Whiplash

Grinding of Teeth

Arthritis

Stress

Previous poor orthodontic treatment

Symptoms

Tired Facial Muscles

Difficulty opening wide

Jaw ‘locking’ when opening or closing

Tenderness in your jaw joint area

Clicking when opening

Treatment

One of the most common causes of TMJ dysfunction is tooth grinding. The tooth grinding can put excessive pressure on the jaw joint. Treatment to relieve this pressure can come in the form of a bite splint that is specially made by your dentist.

Tooth Brush Abrasion

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Tooth Brush Abrasion


It’s great to be enthusiastic about your oral health, but using excessive force when brushing particularly with a hard bristled tooth brush can be damaging for your teeth and gums.  Essentially, this mechanical wearing away of the tooth tissue can result in sensitivity, or notches forming in your teeth right at the gum line labelled as ‘Tooth Brush Abrasion’.

Causes

Poor Brushing Technique

Hard Toothbrush

Whitening Toothpastes/Any abrasive Toothpastes

Old Worn Toothbrush

Symptoms

Sensitive Teeth

Worn tooth at Gum Line

Discolored tooth from enamel loss

Treatment

The best treatment for mild tooth brush abrasion is prevention. Using a non abrasive toothpaste combined with a very soft tooth brush will prevent over brushing. It is also important that your dental hygienist checks on your brushing technique. For more severe forms of tooth brush abrasion the worn areas of tooth can be built up again with white fillings.

Toothache

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Toothache


 

Toothache is a very common condition and can be very painful. Toothache occurs when the nerve inside the tooth becomes infected. This can occur from holes in the teeth, deep fillings and cracks. All of these act as a pathway for bugs to enter the nerve of the tooth.

Causes

Deep Decay

Deep Fillings

Cracks

Trauma

Symptoms

Jaw Ache

Acute Pain

Radiating Pain

Hot Cold Sensitivity

Pain when biting

Painful to touch tooth

Loose tooth

Treatment

There is always an underlying cause of toothache and it is important to correctly diagnose this cause before any treatment starts. The two most common treatments for toothaches are to either remove the tooth or remove the nerve from the tooth. These treatments are performed with local anaesthesia and sedation is also available.